289-389-4499 info@molylaw.com

MOLYNEAUX LAW IN THE MEDIA

The Hamilton employment lawyers at Molyneaux Law are sought by reporters, editors, and TV and radio producers for their opinions and analysis of important, breaking employment law issues and labour law issues. They are also regular columnists at The Lawyer’s Daily, one of Canada’s important publications for the legal profession. The employment lawyers at Molyneaux Law believe in making things fair for Hamilton’s labour force.

Contact us at 289.768.4399 or info@molylaw.com

March 21, 2020

Low-wage workers face tough choices during ‘unprecedented’ COVID-19 times

Roberto Henriquez | CBC Radio Calgary and New Brunswick

We’re all being told to stay home, but many of the jobs that can’t be done from home, like grocery store clerks and delivery drivers, are the same ones that place those employees at a higher risk of contracting COVID-19. Roberto Henriquez discusses temporary layoffs, benefits and relief programs. Listen to audio Calgary, audio New Brunswick or read full article >

March 5, 2020

Missing work to stop coronavirus spread not so easy for workers without sick pay, lawyer says

Sarah Molyneaux | CBC Radio The Current

Rules about sick days in Canada are regulated at the provincial level, and vary from coast to coast. Unpaid sick days average out at three to five days annually across the country. But what if somebody has to go into self-quarantine or be in isolation because they may have been exposed to something like the coronavirus? Sarah talks about these issues with Matt Galloway on CBC Radio The Current. Listen to audio or Read full article >

February 24, 2020

Workplace investigations: Doing them right, setting good example
Roberto Henriquez | The Lawyer’s Daily

Stories of toxic workplace cultures continue to dominate headlines — bullying, harassment and violence in the workplace — but importantly, the workplace culture has started to shift. Read full article >

December 13, 2019

Show your solidarity with the 99 per cent who are fighting back | So, why are union members striking now?
Sarah Molyneaux | The Hamilton Spectator

Teachers. School support staff. HSR Bus drivers. The number of workers in a legal strike position seems to be growing by the day. And, it’s not just here in Hamilton. Education workers engaged in a second single day strike in some Ontario school boards this week.
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November 21, 2019

Roaches fester as Hamilton woman waits for hearing  The Hamilton Spectator

Hamilton Lawyer, Roberto Henriquez, was quoted in the following article by Teviah Moro: “If the very people who are designed to address these issues are now for a host of reasons no longer able to address them, then I think there’s a real question about whether or not access to justice is really being served for the people that use these venues.” Read full article >

October 21, 2019

Doug Ford’s cuts to Ontario’s administrative tribunals set back justice
Roberto Henriquez | The Hamilton Spectator

Unfortunately, over the last year, numerous groups have been raising alarm bells about the present state of Ontario’s administrative tribunals and their lack of resources and funding. Beginning in 2018, the Ford government took steps to create a single entity known as Tribunals Ontario. Read full article >

September 10, 2019

Reality check: Hiring no ‘attractive’ women is not the solution to #MeToo fear
Sarah Molyneaux | Global News

Men being more likely than women to label a behaviour sexual harassment is “pretty telling,” says Sarah Molyneaux, a human rights lawyer based in Hamilton, Ont. Read full article >

August 30, 2019

Workplace bullying solutions in a social media age
Roberto Henriquez | The Lawyer’s Daily

Adults bullied in the workplace are more likely to suffer from both psychiatric concerns and cardiovascular health problems. Additionally, the cost of anxiety and depression, two conditions closely associated with workplace bullying, are estimated to account for US$1 trillion in lost productivity per year globally. Read full article >

August 29, 2019

City of Hamilton’s Marc Lemire probe glosses over internal questions
Sarah Molyneaux | The Hamilton Spectator

The City of Hamilton’s recent announcement that Marc Lemire would not be returning to work in the City’s IT department is welcome news, but it should not be the end of efforts to hold the City to account for his employment and broader inaction on hate crimes in Hamilton. Read full article >

August 23, 2019

Gig economy certification highlights flaws in independent contractor exception
Sarah Molyneaux | The Lawyer’s Daily

Drivers and cyclists for food delivery app Foodora are trying to unionize. Unsurprisingly, the app isn’t prepared to accept unionization without a fight. You can have all the innovation, back-end processing power and user-friendly interfaces you want, but disruptors need to deal with this fact: their business is really about getting things or people from A to B. Read full article >

June 27, 2019

Bill 124: Government eroding workers’ rights in Ontario
Roberto Henriquez | The Lawyer’s Daily

The Act proposed by the Ontario government is troublesome in several ways. The first is the government’s disregard for agreements negotiated with private individuals. On the side of non-unionized employees, the Act undercuts individual choice by eliminating and making illegal any terms that offer individuals anything more than a one percent increase in compensation per year. Read full article >

June 12, 2019

Unclear who benefits from Ontario’s WSIB review
Roberto Henriquez | The Lawyer’s Daily

Whatever your belief on this point, it is obvious that a 30 percent reduction to the WSIB’s premiums will not increase the financial resources available to compensate injured workers. Similarly, a lowering of the WSIB premiums passed onto employers as a form of “rebate” will only reduce the financial incentive for maintaining a safe workplace. Read full article >

June 6, 2019

Facebook ads face legal scrutiny
Sarah Molyneaux | Canadian HR Reporter

Whatever your belief on this point, it is obvious that a 30 percent reduction to the WSIB’s premiums will not increase the financial resources available to compensate injured workers. Similarly, a lowering of the WSIB premiums passed onto employers as a form of “rebate” will only reduce the financial incentive for maintaining a safe workplace. Read full article >

June 6, 2019

Canada’s ranking on Amal Clooney’s TrialWatch
Sarah Molyneaux | The Lawyer’s Daily

With the goal of monitoring and responding to human rights abuse in criminal trials worldwide, TrialWatch has bold objectives: advocating for defendants in the press, funding legal representation and developing a global justice index to rank countries on the fairness of their justice systems. Read full article >

May 3, 2019

Migrant workers fight back through courts, law reform advocacy
Sarah Molyneaux | The Lawyer’s Daily

Among other things, the workers allege that they paid $82,000 to the Link4Staff recruitment agency, which promised them work permits that never arrived. Once they started work, they allege improper deductions from their paycheques, long hours and poor living conditions. Read full article >

May 2, 2019

“The Cost of Children”
Sarah Molyneaux | The Agenda, with Steve Paikin – TVO

Why women’s incomes still drop due to maternity leave. Would having better parental leave policies in Ontario help? Sarah Molyneaux discusses the gender wage gap and the motherhood penalty [Video; 23 mins.]. Watch the video >

March 8, 2019

Why employment standards legislation is a feminist issue
Sarah Molyneaux | The Lawyer’s Daily

Amendments to the Employment Standards Act and the Labour Relations Act by Bill 47 and its companions have rolled back recent strides for workers. Unfortunately, these recent amendments will have a disproportionate and negative impact on women. Women of colour, Indigenous and newcomer women stand to lose the most. Read full article >

January 29, 2019

#BellLetsTalk about practical mental health help for lawyers
Sarah Molyneaux | The Lawyer’s Daily

Tackling mental health challenges isn’t easy. It’s not a job for individuals to address on their own through mindfulness and meditation. If we want to continue to practise and lead long, happy lives, we need to radically rethink how we practise. And, we need to be prepared to incur some expense in the form of health and disability benefits and reduced billable targets to do so. If we’re talking about mental health, we need to put our money where our mouth is. Read full article >